Our Schools

Federal Programs

Title I - Education for the Disadvantaged

Title I- Education for the Disadvantaged

Title I, Part A (Title I) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) provides financial assistance to local educational agencies (LEA's) and schools with high numbers or high percentages of children from low-income families to help ensure that all children meet challenging state academic standards. Growth in academic achievement is measured using Annual Measurable Objectives (AMO's). In 2015, the Elementary and Secondary Education Act was reauthorized as the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).

Understanding North Carolina’s Annual Measurable Objectives

North Carolina Annual Measurable Objectives Targets

As the parent of a student at a Title I school, you have the right to know the professional qualifications of the classroom teachers or paraprofessionals who instruct your child. Jackson County Public Schools makes hiring highly qualified teachers a priority. If your child receives instruction in their classroom by someone who is not highly qualified for more than 4 weeks, you will be notified. You may ask about the qualifications of your child’s teacher via written request to the school principal.

Jackson County Title I Schools

For more information, contact:
Laura Dills, Title I Director
(828) 586-2311 ext. 1950
ldills@jcpsmail.org

Title II- Improving Teacher Quality

Title II- Improving Teacher Quality

Title II is part of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). The purpose of Title II, Part A is to increase the academic achievement of all students by helping schools and districts improve teacher and principal quality and ensure that all teachers are highly qualified. Title II funding supports professional development opportunities for teachers and principals and assists with recruiting and retaining highly qualified teachers and principals.

For more information, contact:
Jason Watson, Secondary Education Director
(828) 586-2311 ext. 1927
jwatson@jcpsmail.org

Title III- Language Instruction for Limited English Proficient and Immigrant Students

Title III- Language Instruction for Limited English Proficient and Immigrant Students

Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) is intended to help ensure that children who have limited English proficiency, including immigrant children and youth, attain English proficiency, develop high levels of academic achievement in English, and meet the same challenging state academic content and student academic standards that all children are expected to meet.

The Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives (AMAO's) for Title III are related to the development and attainment of English language proficiency for limited English proficient students. In accordance with Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Schools Education Act (NCLB), the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction is required to develop annual measurable achievement objectives for these students. Local Education Agencies (LEA's) that do not meet the AMAO's are considered to be in Title III Improvement. Jackson County Public Schools is currently in Title III Improvement.

Testing Students Identified as Limited English Proficient and AMAO information

AMAO Parent Letter

For more information, contact:
Laura Dills, LEP Coordinator
(828) 586-2311 ext. 1950
ldills@jcpsmail.org

Homeless Program

Homeless Program

Congress reauthorized the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act in January of 2002. This federal law includes the Education of Homeless Children and Youth Program that entitles children who are homeless to a free, appropriate public education and requires schools to remove barriers to their enrollment, attendance, and success in school. The McKinney-Vento Homeless Act protects all students who do not have a fixed, regular, and adequate residence.

Children and youth experiencing homelessness have the right to:

  • Receive a free, appropriate public education.
  • Enroll in school immediately, even if lacking documents normally required for enrollment.
  • Enroll in school and attend classes while the school gathers needed documents.
  • Enroll in the local attendance area school or continue attending their school of origin (the school they attended when permanently housed or the school in which they were last enrolled), if that is the parent's, guardian's, or unaccompanied youth's preference is feasible. If the school district believes the school selected is not in the student's best interest, then the district must provide the parent, guardian, or unaccompanied youth with a written explanation of its position and inform him/her of the right to appeal its decision.
  • Receive transportation to and from the school of origin, if requested by the parent, guardian, or unaccompanied youth.
  • Receive educational services comparable to those provided to other students, according to the student's need.

These rights are established under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. This act is the primary piece of federal legislation dealing with the education of children and youth experiencing homelessness in U.S. public schools. It was reauthorized as Title X, Part C, of the No Child Left Behind Act in January 2002. To qualify for these rights, children and youth must be considered homeless according to the McKinney-Vento definition of homeless.

For more information, contact:
Laura Dills, Homeless Education Liasion
(828) 586-2311 ext. 1950
ldills@jcpsmail.org

Or, contact your child’s guidance counselor, nurse, social worker, or principal.

Title VII- Indian, Native Hawiian, and Alaska Native Education

Title VII- Indian, Native Hawaiian and Alaska Native Education

The purpose of Title VII, part of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), is to support the efforts of local educational agencies (LEA's), Indian tribes and organizations, post-secondary institutions, and other entities to meet the unique educational and culturally-related academic needs of American Indian and Alaskan Native students so that such students can meet the same challenging state student academic achievement standards that all other students are expected to meet.

Indian Education Title VII Grant Application, Fall 2016Indian Policies and Procedures, January 2017

For more information, contact:
Angie Dills, Middle & Secondary Education Director
(828) 586-2311 ext. 1954
adills@jcpsmail.org

Title VIII- Impact Aid Program

Title VIII- Impact Aid Program

Title VIII (Impact Aid) is intended to fulfill the federal responsibility to assist with the provision of educational services to federally-connected children in a manner that promotes control by local educational agencies (LEA's) with little or no federal or state involvement. The basis for the program is that certain activities of the Federal Government, such as activities to fulfill federal responsibilities with respect to Indian tribes and activities under Section 514 of the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Civil Relief Act of 1940 (50 U.S.C. App. 574) place a financial burden on local educational agencies serving areas where such activities are carried out and to help such children meet challenging state standards. It is the purpose of this program to provide financial assistance to local educational agencies.

For more information, contact:
Angie Dills, Middle & Secondary Education Director
(828) 586-2311 ext. 1954
adills@jcpsmail.org

Rural, Low-Income Schools (RLIS) Program

Rural, Low-Income Schools (RLIS) Program

The Rural and Low-Income Schools (RLIS) Program provides grant funds to rural school districts that serve concentrations of children from low-income families. RLIS funding supports a range of authorized activities in order to assist school districts in meeting the state's definition of Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) and/or meet Annual Measurable Objectives under the ESEA flexibility.

Awards are issued annually to the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction which makes sub-grants to the state's LEA's and charter schools that meet the applicable requirements. Jackson County Public Schools currently qualifies as part of the RLIS program.

For more information, contact:
Laura Dills, Title I Director
(828) 586-2311 ext. 1950
ldills@jcpsmail.org

Career and Technical Education

Career and Technical Education

Career and Technical Education (CTE) is a state and federally-funded program that provides students in grades 7-12 academic and technical skills as well as the training necessary to be successful in many different career fields. The signature trait of Career and Technical Education is providing hands-on opportunities and application of career-oriented content in the classroom as well as through authentic experiences such as internships, clinical training, lab work, industrial certifications, and personal training. Career and Technical Education content offered in Jackson County includes agriculture, business, marketing, health sciences, early childhood education, culinary arts, carpentry, technology, engineering, and computer science.

For more information, contact:
Angela Dills, Director of Career and Technical Education
(828) 586-2311 ext. 1954
adills@jcpsmail.org

Contacts


Angie Dills

Middle & Secondary Education
Career & Technical Education
Title II, Title VII, Title VIII

(828) 586-2311 ext. 1954
adills@jcpsmail.org


Laura Dills

Elementary Education
Title I, Title III, Homeless, RLIS
(828) 586-2311 ext. 1950
ldills@jcpsmail.org


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